Maker's Philosophy

The Maker's Bill of Rights

  • Meaningful and specific parts lists shall be included
  • Cases shall be easy to open
  • Batteries should be replaceable
  • Special tools are allowed only for darn good reasons
  • Profiting by selling expensive special tools is wrong and not making special tools available is even worse
  • Torx is OK; tamperproof is rarely OK
  • Components, not entire subassemblies, shall be replaceable
  • Consumables, like fuses and filters, shall be easy to access
  • Circuit boards and code shall be commented
  • Power from USB is good; power from proprietary power adapters is bad
  • Standard connectors shall have pinouts defined
  • If it snaps shut, it shall snap open
  • Screws better than glues
  • Docs and drivers shall have permanent links and shall reside for all perpetuity at http://www.archive.org
  • Ease of repair shall be a design ideal, not an afterthought
  • Metric or standard, not both
  • Schematics shall be included

Crafter's Manifesto

  • People get satisfaction for being able to create/craft things because they can see themselves in the objects the make. This is not possible with purchased products.
  • Things that people have made themselves have magic powers. They have hidden meanings that other people can't see.
  • The things people make they usually want to keep and update. Crafting is not against consumption it is against throwing things away.
  • People seek recognition for the things they have made. Primarily it comes from their friends and family. This manifests as an economy of gifts.
  • People who believe they are producing genuinely cool things seek broader exposure for their products. This creates opportunities for alternative publishing channels
  • Work inspires work. Seeing what other people have made generates new ideas and design.
  • Essential for crafting are tools, which are accessible, portable, and easy to learn.
  • Materials become important. Knowledge of what they are made of and where to get them becomes essential.
  • Recipes become important. The ability to create and distribute interesting recipes becomes valuable.
  • Learning techniques brings people together. This creates online and offline communities or practice.
  • Craft-oriented people seek opportunities to discover interesting things and meet their makers. This creates marketplaces.
  • At the bottom, crafting is a form of play.